Brad Sorte Executive Director of Caron Renaissance and Caron Ocean Drive and Vice President of Florida Operations Brad Sorte, MSW, MBA, is the Executive Director of Caron Renaissance & Caron Ocean Drive and VP of Florida Operations for Caron Treatment Centers. In his role, he combines his knowledge of business and clinical practice to provide a culture where the business of healthcare never interferes with the fundamental needs of each individual client. Brad holds both a Master of Social Work and a Master of Business Administration degree from Florida Atlantic University, a Bachelor of Arts degree in Psychology from Rice University and a Bachelor of Science degree in Legal Studies from Kaplan University.Brad has a passion for looking at the entire family system when helping a patient recover from alcoholism, chemical dependency and process addictions. Drawing from his years of practice working with families, Brad believes that for the best chance of success, each family member must participate and feel supported in the healing process. Brad has been a featured speaker at conferences in the United States and abroad. He has also been featured in the Palm Beach Post and Miami Herald, as well as various industry publications. He is a member of the Palm Beach Chapter of the Young Presidents Organization and the American College of Healthcare Executives. He serves as a board member and chair of the policy committee for the Florida Alliance for Recovery as well as an advisory board member for the Delray Beach Drug Task Force.

Brad Sorte Executive Director of Caron Renaissance and Caron Ocean Drive and Vice President of Florida Operations Brad Sorte, MSW, MBA, is the Executive Director of Caron Renaissance & Caron Ocean Drive and VP of Florida Operations for Caron Treatment Centers. In his role, he combines his knowledge of business and clinical practice to provide […]

PRESENTED BY CARON TREATMENT CENTER Addiction Relapse Happens, It Is Not A Sign Of Failure Like any other chronic illness, addiction is a disease of remission and relapse. By Brad Sorte JGI/Jamie Grill via Getty Images Addiction is often viewed as a moral issue. For example, it only takes one slip up and someone who has been sober for 10 years will be considered a failure. But addiction, like other diseases such as cancer and diabetes, is a disease that can include both remission and relapse. A relapse shouldn’t represent a failure but, rather, a symptom of the chronic illness that it is. While addiction is a brain disease that needs ongoing treatment and attention, it is not approached in the same way as other chronic illnesses such as diabetes. This is mainly due to the fact that for decades the only outcome considered successful for someone battling addiction has been lifetime sobriety. Yet this standard of perfection is not applied to people who have other chronic illnesses. If a person with diabetes develops complications, it isn’t viewed as a moral failure; it is considered a progression of the illness. Research has shown that there are similar relapse rates among all chronic diseases, including addiction. A study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association in 2000 found that 40 to 60 percent of drug addiction patients relapse compared to 30 to 50 percent of Type 1 diabetes patients, 50 to 70 percent of hypertension patients and 50 to 70 percent of patients with asthma. Still, because of the stigma and judgement that comes with substance use and abuse, it can be harder for them to get the help they need. We need to begin to view the 40-plus million Americans who are harmfully using substances through the same lens that we use for other chronic diseases. We need to consider a “relapse,” as a recurrence of the disease that should be addressed through a new treatment plan, much like our approach to cancer. Fortunately, we can change how we regard and treat addiction, the ongoing challenges and the way we define success. Here are the first steps: Defining A Good Outcome A major challenge for treatment professionals, and even more so for those we treat, is that there is no agreement on what we consider to be a good outcome. For many years, only one outcome was considered successful: lifetime abstinence. There was no distinction or consideration of the reasons for the relapse. The amount of time the patient had been successfully living in sobriety or the substance use that resulted in a relapse were not taken into account. Using lifelong remission as the one and only possible outcome is not useful for those of us who treat patients or for the patients and families who come to us for treatment. Identifying Addiction Issues Before It’s Too Late Not all primary care providers are trained to recognize substance use disorder or the danger signs of those who may be misusing alcohol and prescription drugs. Providers should be prepared and trained on how to ask their patients about drugs just as they currently ask about tobacco use, alcohol consumption and eating habits. Having these important conversations can lead to early identification, interventions and referrals to reliable, evidence-based treatment programs. Changing Treatment Viewing addiction as a chronic illness also changes how we approach relapse. A person with diabetes experiencing a setback would likely go to her primary care provider, either because she understands she needs help or because of the resulting changes in her health. Those struggling with a substance use disorder should feel just as comfortable speaking to their primary care provider, therapist or trusted individuals about their relapse. We need to create an environment in which we can talk about how to tailor individual treatment plans based on the person, how addiction manifests in that person and where they are in the disease cycle and treatment continuum. We need a multi-systemic approach to treating substance use disorder that evaluates the patient and his or her addiction disorder to determine which evidence-based therapies and treatments will best fit that individual’s needs. To think there is any one right way to approach alcohol and drug dependence is inconsistent with what science tells us about the disease of addiction and how we know, understand and conceptualize the treatment of chronic illnesses. If we can shift the way we view addiction, then we open ourselves up to the possibilities of changing addiction treatment for the better. If you or someone you know is struggling with addiction or has experienced a relapse with drugs or alcohol, Caron Treatment Centers can help. Caron is here to provide addiction care and support for the entire family. Trust Caron to help pick up the pieces and put your family back together. Download Brad Sorte Executive Director of Caron Renaissance and Caron Ocean Drive and Vice President of Florida Operations Suggest a correction MORE:PsychiatryDrug AbuseAddictionAlcohol AbuseSubstance Use Disorder Addiction Relapse Happens, It Is Not A Sign Of Failure CONVERSATIONS

PRESENTED BY CARON TREATMENT CENTER Addiction Relapse Happens, It Is Not A Sign Of Failure Like any other chronic illness, addiction is a disease of remission and relapse. By Brad Sorte JGI/Jamie Grill via Getty Images Addiction is often viewed as a moral issue. For example, it only takes one slip up and someone who […]

This Is What The Most Annoying Co-Workers Have In Common You’re on notice, micromanagers and loud chewers. By Brittany Wong PeopleImages via Getty Images 190 For better or worse, most of us spend more time with our co-workers than we do with our family and friends. Sometimes, that closeness breeds contempt, especially in cases where a colleague has annoying habits or seems totally oblivious to everyone else around them. (We see you, loud eaters and passive-aggressive email senders.) Lynn Taylor, an etiquette expert and author of Tame Your Terrible Office Tyrant: How to Manage Childish Boss Behavior & Thrive in Your Job, says the most irritating behavior tends to fall into two categories: behavioral and discourteous. Bad behavior includes gossiping, taking credit for work someone else did and micromanaging. Poorly behaved co-workers can zap productivity and morale in the office in very significant ways. Discourteous offenders, meanwhile, have little to no etiquette skills. “Think gum smackers, hummers, drawer slammers, pen clickers and those oblivious to hygiene or odorous foods they bring into the office,” Taylor said. According to Taylor, if you feel compelled to voice your complaints about your co-worker, you need to tread lightly. “Set up a lunch or find a neutral environment to have a friendly chat,” Taylor said. “Start on a positive note and explain that you enjoy working with them. Then, tell them what set you back or bothered you about their behavior. Say that you both have more to gain by working together harmoniously. End on a positive, upbeat note.” Now that you know how to handle annoying co-workers, you may be curious to know if the stuff that bothers you bothers others. Below, our readers share the most irksome habits and behaviors they’ve witnessed in their offices. (Here’s hoping the co-workers they’re talking about read this.) 1. “Chewing with their mouth open and smacking loudly.” ― Sara F. 2. “Micromanaging and they’re not even the manager!” ― Mando R. 3. “Ugh, my co-worker likes to trim his nails at his desk. I have a rage fit at every little ‘clip clip.’” ― Becky G. 4. “My office has six desks in one room. This one guy clipped his nails at his desk, constantly took personal phone calls and always had a super loud fan blowing the already cold air at everyone else. He didn’t last very long.” ― Hannah M. 5. “Talking nonstop before I’ve even had a chance to take a sip of coffee or sit down.” ― Alexis S. 6. “Taking off their shoes, or otherwise having no self awareness or personal hygiene.” ― Laura O. 7. “Using their desk as a personal kitchen and leaving dirty dishes out for weeks.” ― Beth W. 8. “Whistling. Or telling stories of friends and family I do not know and have never met as though I am supposed to know them.” ― Ariella W. 9. “Aggressively jumping to get the plum assignments, even when there’s someone interested who’d be better suited to the job. Then, they don’t do the work required properly or completely, leaving co-workers, or the supervisor, to pick up the slack.” ― Barbara N. 10. “Tattletales. It’s the same as kindergarten.” ― Rachel D. 11. “Laziness that makes the rest of us in the department or team look bad. I used to be a security guard, and some of them would sleep.” ― Christina A. 12. “Coming into the office exactly when their shift begins, not even a minute early, and then leaving before their shift is over and complaining the whole time.” ― Nyssa R. 13. “Clearing their throat.” ― Natasha O. 14. “Walking heavy where it sounds like a heard of cattle stampeding through the office and it’s even carpeted.” ― Rhonda K. RELATED STORIESThese Are The Types Of Coworkers People Complain About Most In Therapy10 Ways To Deal With A Difficult CoworkerKeeping It Collegial with Coworkers Who Grate Your Nerves Download BEFORE YOU GO Brittany Wong Relationships Editor, HuffPost Suggest a correction MORE:EtiquettePassive–Aggressive Behavior Co Workers This Is What The Most Annoying Co-Workers Have In Common 190 CONVERSATIONS

This Is What The Most Annoying Co-Workers Have In Common You’re on notice, micromanagers and loud chewers. By Brittany Wong PeopleImages via Getty Images 190 For better or worse, most of us spend more time with our co-workers than we do with our family and friends. Sometimes, that closeness breeds contempt, especially in cases where […]

WELLNESS What South Korea Can Teach The World About Living Well Take notes from the Winter Olympics host country. By Lindsay Holmes and Carolyn Gregoire Fabrizio Bensch/Reuters The culture that dreamed up K-pop, kimchi and taekwondo has a lot to share with the rest of the world about prioritizing the mind and body. In fact, South Korea is home to some of the best health care, entertainment and wellness wisdom in the world. Below are a few things the 2018 Winter Olympicshost country can teach the rest of us about living a good, healthy life: One word: kimchi woyzzeck via Getty ImagesKimchi is served with most meals in Korea. Kimchi — fermented cabbage with garlic, vinegar and spices — is a staple of Korean cuisine. Labeled one of the “world’s healthiest foods” by Health.com, kimchi is a condiment served with most meals in Korea. (And, they report, it’s so abundant that Koreans even say “kimchi” instead of “cheese” when snapping photos!) It’s filled with vitamins A, B and C, but perhaps more importantly, kimchi is loaded with probiotics, which can support healthy digestion. What’s more, lactobacilli, one probiotic found in kimchi, is thought to possibly be an anticancer agent. They take internet dependency seriously South Korea is one of the most plugged-in countries on the globe, with the majority of its people having access to broadband internet and smartphones. Surveys suggest an estimated 10 percent of teens in the region are addicted to the internet, according to The Washington Post. South Korea has been confronting this internet attachment head-on for more than a decade. There are camps and treatment centers for people who are dealing with addictive behaviors around online gaming and internet browsing, and the government enacted measures like the “Shutdown Law,” which prevents access to individuals under the age of 16 after midnight. Tackling device dependency is a smart move: Research shows too much tech can cause blurred vision, poor sleep, headaches,mood issues and more. They make entertainment a priority RB/Bauer-Griffin via Getty ImagesKorean K-pop band BTS is seen performing at “Jimmy Kimmel Live” in November. South Korean arts and pop culture have been exported around the world ― and for good reason. South Koreans put a high value on arts and entertainment, and it’s resulted in a culture with a rich film, theater, music and visual arts scene. Pop music (also known as K-pop) is a multibillion-dollar industry in Korea. “K-pop is known for its high cuteness factor, fast-paced choreography and seductive winks, smiles and double takes, as well as lyrics that tend toward frothy fun or breakup boohoo,” Patrick Healy wrote in The New York Times in 2013. It’s a phenomenon that may even have health and well-being payoffs. A number of studies have demonstrated the mood-boosting power of music, including a 2013 University of Missouri study that showed listening to happy music (and trying to feel happy during it) might elevate mood. A popular professional sport focuses on the body AND the mind The traditional Korean martial art of taekwondo fuses self-defense and combat. But taekwondo is more than a physical activity: It’s also a philosophy of using the strength of the body and the power of the mind to create greater peace in the world. According to World Taekwondo, the sport is a “discipline that shows ways of enhancing our spirit and life through training our body and mind.” As the international federation governing the sport explained: Taekwondo can be characterized by unity: the unity of body, mind, and life, and the unity of the pose [“poomsae”] and confrontation, and cracking down. When you do Taekwondo, you should make your mind peaceful and synchronize your mind with your movements, and extend this harmony to your life and society. This is how in Taekwondo the principle of physical movements, the principle of mind training, and the principle of life become one and the same. They enjoy the great outdoors Travel and Still life photography via Getty ImagesMany South Koreans visit campgrounds to enjoy time in nature. Camping is becoming an increasingly popular trend in South Korea — and many campers there are seeking refuge from the urban hustle without ever leaving the city. Seoul-based international news outlet Arirang News reported in 2013 that stressed-out urbanites flock to campgrounds within the city to enjoy some relaxing time in nature. “We live in an extremely fierce and competitive world,” one Seoul resident told Arirang News. “Coming out here in nature, I feel a sense of healing, so I keep coming back.” Research shows that camping can have mental and physical health perks, from getting better sleep to improving mood to increasing exercise. They’re happy with their health care South Korea has had a universal health care plan since 1989, and studies have been conducted on how other nations can mimic their system. A 2016 study found that the quality of care offered in Korea had the largest effect on satisfaction within its health care system. And out of 15 countries surveyed in a 2013 Ipsos poll, South Koreans were most satisfied with their medical care. In fact, they scored the highest across all categories in the poll. “National health insurance in Korea has been successful in mobilizing resources for health care, rapidly extending population coverage, effectively pooling public and private resources to purchase health care for the entire population, and containing health care expenditure,” Soonman Kwon, professor of public health at Seoul National University, wrote in the Oxford Journals’ Health Policy And Planning. This is an updated version of an article by Carolyn Gregoire that was originally published in February 2014. Download BEFORE YOU GO PHOTO GALLERY 100 Ways To De-Stress Lindsay Holmes Senior Wellness Editor, HuffPost Carolyn Gregoire Senior Writer, The Huffington Post Suggest a correction MORE:South KoreaFitnessNutrition2018 Winter Olympics What South Korea Can Teach The World About Living Well CONVERSATIONS

WELLNESS What South Korea Can Teach The World About Living Well Take notes from the Winter Olympics host country. By Lindsay Holmes and Carolyn Gregoire Fabrizio Bensch/Reuters The culture that dreamed up K-pop, kimchi and taekwondo has a lot to share with the rest of the world about prioritizing the mind and body. In fact, […]